Georgia O’Keeffe, her barrel of bones, and finding your thing

Art fairs are now everywhere, all the time.  The pressure is always on, and I think I should move my studio to Siberia or the desert.

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Georgia O’Keeffe found her escape from the noise when, in her forties, she discovered the Great Southwest. Already a successful painter who was recognized for her closely framed flowers, O’Keeffe sought new subject matter and distance from a complex romance with photographer Alfred Steiglitz. In 1929 she found in New Mexico what she described as:

such a beautiful, untouched lonely feeling place, such a fine part of what I call the ‘Faraway’

She would spend the next decade traveling back and forth from New Mexico to New York and Lake George. Eventually she made a permanent relocation to Abiquiú, where she would live and paint until her death at 98.

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For me, the magic of O’Keeffe lies in opposites. Joan Didion described her as “simply hard”, and copious photo documentation concurs- she is American’s Marlboro Woman. Her radiant paintings, however, with their wavering forms evoke the very softest of experiences. Georgia O’Keeffe was a paradox: blunt and the same time swept away by mystery; solo and yet entwined with lovers. When speaking of her art she managed to be mystical and contrarian all at once and when making art she found the infinity by zeroing in.

Georgia’s mind reveals to us that the ineffable and the concrete are not in conflict. In her own beautiful words

“abstraction is often the most definite form for the intangible thing in myself that I can clarify in paint.”

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New Mexico was her place. The land felt right, the light felt right, and the beauty resonated with her deeply. She tooled around in a Model A Ford, which also doubled as a painting studio, and took frequent rambling walks.  O’Keeffe began collecting skulls, bones and pieces of the desert that she could take with her. By the end of her first few summers there, she had filled the Ghost Ranch windowsills with feathers and finds. She had also amassed a barrel of bones, which became the source materials for her series of iconic bone paintings.

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It seems that  world has always pined to see her work through Freudian and symbolic lenses: wanting to understand her flowers as sexual, and her skulls as morbid and so on. Georgia rejected all that.  In this inspiring video Georgia O’Keeffe sets the record straight about the story of the bones:

“People think they are about death.  They are not about death.  They are simply shapes that please me.”


This creative exercise, inspired by Georgia’s barrel of bones, is about careful observation of shape and form.  It is also about discovering inspiration and paying homage to what simply pleases you.

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FIND YOUR THINGS: A COLLECTION OF SHAPES

  1. Select a home for your collection- window sill, dresser top, shelf etc.
  2. Think about a type of objects pleases or interests you- bottles, feathers, wires etc.
  3. Keep a look-out for these things – in your house, on the street, in the woods
  4.  Build a collection over time
  5. Admire your objects. Look closely, relish the peculiarities, enjoy the whole
  6. Take a picture of your collection and share it #TCHCollection or email to thecreativehours@gmail.com

 

Further reading:

Georgia by Dawn Tripp, A recently released work of historic fiction that paints a picture of Georgia O’Keeffe’s early life, her romantic involvement with Alfred Stieglitz and her journey against odds to establish herself as an independent and successful artist.

 

 

Georgia O’Keeffe and the Camera: The Art of Identity, produced by the Portland Museum of Art, this book brings together a lifetime of portraits of Georgia O’Keeffe from artists and photographers including: Warhol, Stieglitz and Webb.

 

 

Portrait of an Artist: Georgia O’Keeffe by Laurie Lisle,
Georgia O’Keeffe, an excellent biography of one of the most original painters America has ever produced, who left behind a remarkable legacy when she died at the age of ninety-eight. Her vivid visual vocabulary had a stunning, profound, and lasting influence on American art.